Take the Children.

Take the Children, written and illustrated by Dorothy King, Morrow, 1945, 1st pr, Take the Children, written and illustrated by Dorothy King, Morrow, 1945, 1st pr, Take the Children, written and illustrated by Dorothy King, Morrow, 1945, 1st pr

In a pretty realistic story, six children lose their name tags on their trip home on an ocean liner, and they need the reader's help in getting home. This book is said to reflect the urgency of repatriating children after the confusion of World War Two. I had the 1945 version as a child, the 1951 version would not have had the little Russian figure. Probably influenced me... see the interesting comment below.

$125.00

 

Printer-friendly version
Take the Children, written and illustrated by Dorothy King, Morrow, 1945, 1st pr
Take the Children, written and illustrated by Dorothy King, Morrow, 1945, 1st pr
Take the Children, written and illustrated by Dorothy King, Morrow, 1945, 1st pr
Take the Children.
King, Dorothy N.
/DNK, illustrator.
New York: William Morrow, 1945 1st printing of this book; in paper boards with painting of children waving from the SS Homeland and a blue back; not spiral bound as with later printing; sad sun on front endpaper and happy sun on rear endpaper with no free endpapers as issued, doubled pages; six card children are stored on the deck and can be fit in their homeland pages; in A jacket identical to boards; oblong 9.25x6.75 inches; np.
Play Book Moveable
CONDITION: Very Good in Very Good jacket; no names, bright, clean boards with rubs to extremities, all nice and clean inside, with three of the children showing creases on their necks and 1/16" tears to the sides of their slots; in jacket with light edgewear all around, more on spine top, 2" tear on crease; unclipped 1.50.
Condition Images: 
Take the Children, written and illustrated by Dorothy King, Morrow, 1945, 1st pr
Control Number: 
19053

Comments

Changes in Take the Children

It is interesting to note that the 1945 hardcover 1st edition includes Ivan, a Russian boy. Russia was an ally of the US in 1945. Our 1951 spiral-bound edition substitutes Tony, an Italian. During WWII Italy was an enemy but became an ally thereafter. Politics even gets into children's literature. All of the other children are unchanged: England, Norway, Switzerland, France, and Holland, who were allies both during and after WWII.

this is my grand aunts book

this is my grand aunts book and i think it is ok

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.